News

Black carp (Mylopharyngodon piceus)

Black carp is a freshwater fish scientifically known as Mylopharyngodon piceus. It is native to rivers and lakes of Asia, being considered one of the four Chinese major carps.

Black carp is a carnivorous fish associated to the bottom. Large juveniles and adults use their heavy pharyngeal teeth to crash molluscs shells and feed on them. So, this carp is cultured not only to be sold as meat, but also for biological control in polycultures with other carps or even other fish species – like catfish ponds in USA – because it feeds on molluscs that can be intermediate hosts for diseases.

Despite its highly marketable potential, wild information about Black carp is rare. Much information related to farm conditions for this species is also missing, which makes it difficult to address and improve its welfare conditions in farms. So, more research about basic information from wild and cultured Black carp is urgently needed.

If you want to know more about Black carp, visit its short profile in our FishEthoBase here.

(posted on Aug. 10, 2022)

New short profile published at FishEthoBase!

Recently we have published one more short profile in our FishEthoBase, the first online and open access database to assemble ethological scientific knowledge on farmed fishes systematically. This database targets scientists and practitioners, but also NGOs, the general public, and other possible stakeholders.

This new short profile is about the Orangefin labeo fish, scientifically known as Labeo calbasu. It is an Asian cyprinid fish with a demersal habit that is important for commercial and recreational fisheries, and also being frequently used in game fishing in ponds and reservoirs. Such profile was authored by Caroline Marques Maia, revised by María J. Cabrera-Álvarez and revised and edited by Jenny Volstorf.

If you are interested, visit the short profile of Orangefin labeo at our database here.

(posted on Aug. 5, 2022)

New paper!

The open access paper "Finding the “golden stocking density”: A balance between fish welfare and farmers' perspectives" by João Saraiva and Pablo Arechavala from our team, together with Patricia R. Lopez, was recently published in Frontiers in Veterinary Science journal.

It is difficult to set minimum and maximum stocking density levels that are able to protect fish welfare. However, there is no doubt that too low or too high stocking densities can have negative impacts on fish welfare and/or production. So, the authors propose a way to select density on captive fish and monitor its potential effects by integrating solid welfare assessment and good management practices.

If you are interested, access the full paper here.

(posted on July 28, 2022)

New episodes of our Fish Talk podcast!

FishTalk is our podcast, which is updated monthly. FishEthoBase is a Fish Talk programme that is composed of series of brief audios focused on fish species with profiles already published in our FishEthoBase. The idea is to give information about natural needs, behaviours or farming conditions of fishes and other aquatic farmed animals in less than 3 min.

Now we just released new episodes of FishEthoBase programme. This time the episodes are focused on Common cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis), Mexican four-eyed octopus (Octopus maya) and Common octopus (Octopus vulgaris).

If you are interested, please click here to listen to the new episodes (series 6).

(posted on July 19, 2022)

New paper!

We believe that solid scientific knowledge is fundamental to improve the welfare of fishes and other farmed aquatic animals in a practical way. Thus, the publication of good quality papers that help filling the knowledge gaps on the welfare of such animals is the main basis for this.

In this line, a new paper from Joao Saraiva and Pablo Arechavala from our team, together with Patricia R. Lopez, was recently accepted for publication in Frontiers in Veterinary Science journal. This open access paper is about density and welfare in farmed fishes, which is more complex than it seems.

The authors bring their views on this important topic, proposing a way to select density on captive fish and monitor its potential effects by integrating solid welfare assessment and good management practices.

If you want to access the paper abstract, click here.

(posted on July 12, 2022)







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